PART 3

Research - Unit 7

Primary Research / V&A Museum / Traditional Storing Furniture

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Bureau-Cabinet, about 1735, England or Germany.

Cabinet (armoire etagere), about 1900, Louis Majorella, France.

Shelved Cabinet, about 1850, Japan.

The ‘Marie de Medici’ Cabinet, about 1630-1660, France or Netherlands.

Primary Research / V&A Museum / Contemporary Storing Furniture

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Writing Desk, 1923-1925, Edward Maufe, Britain.

Table: ‘Mono Table’, 1995, Konstantin Grcic, Britain.

‘You can’t lay down your memories’ (chest of drawers), 1991, Tejo Remy, Netherlands.

Storage Unit, model ESU 421-C, 1949-1950, Charles Eames, USA.

‘Table=Chest’, 1997, Tomato Azumi, England.

Primary Research / V&A Museum / Traditional Wardrobe

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Wardrobe, 1939, Eugene Berman, France.

Clothes Press (wardrobe), 1610-1640, England.

Primary Research / V&A Museum / Contemporary Cabinet

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Cabinet, 1916, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Britain.

Cocktail Cabinet, 1933, Maurice Adams, Britain.

Drop-Front Writing Desk ‘Frankfurt Cabinet’, 1985-1986, Norbert Berghof, Germany.

‘Casablance’ (sideboard), 1981, Ettore Jr Sottsass, Milan.

Cabinet, 1951, Gio Ponti, Italy.

Drawers in irregular form (chest of drawer), 1970, Shiro Kuramata, Milan.

I focus on looking at different period of storage furniture. 

The traditional furniture group's design are looking bit heavy and very common usual, compare to the modern furniture group's design, the latter are looking more minimal and useful, and start using some colourful decoration rather than patterns.

Primary Research / SKANDIUM / Structures

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Primary Research / SKANDIUM / Shelf

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Primary Research / SKANDIUM / Hanging Clothes Style

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Primary Research / Selfridges / MUJI / Different Brands Hanging Clothes Style

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This group of photos show the different class of brands will have different style looking of store design.

Luxury brands usually have a huge space for scene that suits the new collection, less clothes, each clothes has gap to breath, have seating area.

The middle one, it gives me feeling about the eco-style and environment friendly, not only because it sets up clothes with a lot of plants, is about the material its used for the clothes, the material using of clothes hangers.

The last one is my favorite brands - MUJI, the setting design of its store is always the clearest, everytime I been there, I know what I am looking for and where is it. Because it does not like other cheap clothes brands' shop, a lot of missy clothes pile up on the middle of store.

Primary Research / Friends Room / Where you put your Clothes?

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These two groups of photos are all about my friends wardrobes. I asked them to send me a photo about how you deal with your clothes.

As you see, many of them are pile up on somewhere or on something, or hanging to somewhere, because both actions are quick and easy.

The inside structure of wardrobe deicis what way you gonna deal with your clothes, so some of them bought other organizer for saving more spaces.

Primary Research / Friends Room / Where you put your Clothes?

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Book notes / Lifestyle shopping / Rob Shields

Rob Shields. (1992) Lifestyle shopping : the subject of consumption. London : Routledge.

The significance of consumption for the economy and for the culture of people’s everyday lives is in change.

 For a moment, shoppers, mostly women, were treated as royalty and could shop for bits of luxury.

 Shopping, as a leisure activity, embraces not only the literal forms of consumption which involve purchase and economic exchange. In addition, it is elaborated by practices of browsing, looking, consuming the environment of various purpose-built ‘consumption spaces’.

 Consumption spaces are host to unique cultural forms by combining economic and leisure forms which demand new practices.

The person is a privileged ‘object’ whiten a world of objects merely by possession of the consciousness of its own activating mechanism; it ‘feels’ the local motion we call desire. 

Instead, the subject in the mall is apt to be a casualty of not only desire but anxiety and envy.

 The refrain of ‘Lost in the Supermarket’, goes something like :

Lost in the Supermarket

Can no longer shop happily,

I came in here for a special offer

‘Guaranteed Personality’

The lyric encapsulates some of the contradictions experienced today by the ‘subject of consumption’.

For the Japanese, shopping is not merely the acquisition of things : it is the buying of identity; an ‘aesthetics of self’ which establishes one’s ‘social being’.

John Clammer argues that this is true even of the consumption of ‘necessities’ in any situation where choice reflects decisions about self, taste, images of the body and social distinctions.

The urge to consume was, thus, a link between the unknown realm of the passions and the rational construction of the everyday world.

More particularly there was developed, as the unifying conception ‘underlying’ the variety of wants, a conception of selfhood as individuated personal identity. The self, as any other ‘universal’, could become conscious within us only through the medium of some particular content, some specific set of events or desires. The ‘self’ which exists potentially within us, it was held, becomes actual through the process of consumption.

Taken together these traditions represent certain possibilities within the framework of bourgeois psychology. Consumption could be viewed variously as a simple want for things whose inherent attractiveness was a property of nature (utility), as a want for things whose attractiveness depended on the assumption that they were wanted, or already possessed, by others (envy), or as a want for things whose attractiveness was the reflex image of the self (desire).

Book notes / Spent / Geoffrey Miller

Geoffrey Miller. (2009) Spent : sex, evolution and the secrets of consumerism. London : William Heinemann.

Although common sense sats we buy things because we think we’ll enjoy owning and suing them, research shows that the pleasure of acquisition are usually short-lived at best.

Humans evolved in small social groups in which image and status were all-important, not only for survival, but for attracting mates, impressing friends, and rearing children.

Today we ornament ourselves with good and services more to make an impression on other people’s minds than to enjoy owning a chunk of matter - a fact that renders ‘materialism’ a profoundly misleading term for much of consumption. Many products are signal first and material objects second. Our vast social-primate brains evolved to pursue one central social goal : to look good in the eyes of others. Buying impressive products in a money-based economy is just the most recent way to fulfill that goal.

We buy things for statues or for hedonism, to show off to others or to please ourselves.

Book notes / Muji / Eri Hamaji, Maggie Hohle, Masaaki Kanai

Eri Hamaji, Maggie Hohle, Masaaki Kanai. (2010) Muji. New York : Rizzoli.

MUJI was founded in Japan in 1980 as an antithesis to the habits of consumer society at that time. On one hand, foreign-made luxury brands were gaining popularity within an economic environment of ever-rising prosperity. On the other, poor-quality, low-priced goods were appearing on the market, and had a polarizing effect on consumption patterns.

MUJI was conceived as a critique of this prevailing condition, with the purpose of restoring a version of products that are actually useful for the customer. The concept was born of the intersection of two distinct stances : no brand and the value of good items. MUJI began within three steps : selecting the materials, scrutinizing the processes, and simplifying the packaging.

MUJI’s concept of emphasizing the intrinsic appeal of an object through rationalization and meticulous elimination of excess is closely connected to the traditionally Japanese aesthetic of ‘su’ - meaning plain or unadorned - the idea that simplicity is not merely modest or frugal, but could possible be more appealing than luxury.

‘MUJI for Each and Every Person’

‘Lower Priced For a Reason’

‘This is What I Want’

The tree, or company, absorbs people’s desires and bears fruit, or products. MUJI’s marketing is not about making products that respond generously to people’s desires. It’s about creating a new market by changing the quality of people’s appetite for living, and influencing the shape their desires take. The individual who gets hold of a MUJI product personally awakens to the rational relationship that exists between manufacturing and consumption.

Book notes / Muji / Eri Hamaji, Maggie Hohle, Masaaki Kanai

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Book notes / Stuff / Daniel Miller

Daniel Miller. (2010) Stuff. Cambridge : Polity.

Habitus

There is nature, but culture gives us our second-nature, that which we habitually do without thought. Things, not, mind you, individual things, but the whole system of things, with their internal order, make us the people we are.

Humanity starts with nature itself. This is the raw material from which we make our lives. Our social evolution consists not of advances in consciousness per se but in our increasing capacity to create an artifactual world from nature.

Book notes / Nanto Fukasawa / Super Normal / Author see below

Naoto Fukasawa, Antony Gormley, Bill Moggridge, Jasper Morrison, Masato Sasaki, Ken’ya Hara. (2007) Naoto Fukasawa. London : Phaidon.

Naoto Fukasawa & Jasper Morrison. (2008) Super normal : sensations of the ordinary. Baden : Lars Müller.

‘Without Thought’, in reference to my observations at the time of how people unconsciously handle material objects. Within the conventional view that design exists to stimulate awareness.

'Super Normal' refers exactly to that simple, straight-froward hammer icon. And comfort in using anonymous things that have been around for a long time. Which shows the beauty which takes time to be noticed, which may become beautiful through use, the beauty of the everyday, the long-term beauty.

They are ‘Super’ because they represent designs successfully tried and tested to the point of total acceptance in everyday life. ‘Normal’ is the situation where something has blended comfortably Into our lives.

Looking at the Japanese lifestyle, though the way of how they treat their stuff, how they think behind into their design. I been learnt a lot from MUJI and Naoto Fukasawa. Both of references are representing the Japanese's soul. I especially love the idea of 'without thought' design, because it is quite hard to think and design that suit to everybody's subconsciousness, but when you see his design, you just feel wow, I had this similar idea before! or this little design helps my life a lot!

Book notes / Spent / Geoffrey Miller

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Book notes / Product minimalism

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Book notes / Nanto Fukasawa

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Book notes / Lifestyle shopping / Rob Shields

Rob Shields. (1992) Lifestyle shopping : the subject of consumption. London : Routledge.

‘The surface of the body becomes the symbolic state upon which the drama of socialization is enacted, and bodily adornment becomes the language through which it is expressed.

Appearance is a composite concept that includes all the physical attributes and movements of the person, namely, (i) the body and its gestures, and (ii) the transformation of this given physical body by adornments such as clothes, accessories, and cosmetics.

The programmed appearance is a person’s claim to identity, value, mood and attitude; others can dovetail their revue by placing those aspects announced by the former.

Clothes are presented visually, directly to a potentially infinite audience.

Shops are furnished to make shopping comfortable and leisurely. Fashion magazined abound; always the latest editions, and pages where the represented designers’ clothes are featured or advertised are tagged to draw the readers' attention.

This self-referencing is captured in the psychoanalytic - ‘the tendency to admire one’s own body and display it to others, so that these others can share in the admiration’.

Clothes have always been conceived as part of an individual’s identity claims. Individuals, therefore, take pains to program their clothes as part of their appearance.

Components of the categorization of clothes:

Formal Informal

Day Day-formal Day-informal

Night Night-formal Night-informal

The very spectacle of consumption - the windows filled with goods, the lighting, the displays, the other shoppers, the places to meet - has also historically been signaled as a feminine domain, and associated with femininity.

By exploring shop design, we can get a preliminary sense of how looking is organized within shopping. The design and layout of shops inform and incites acts of looking and some of the visual pleasures on offer.

Shopping, however, is not just simple acquisition - it has symbolic, spatial, economic, class and gender aspects.

Book notes / Through the wardrobe / Ali Guy, Eileen Green, Maura Banim

Ali Guy, Eileen Green, Maura Banim. (2001)Through the wardrobe : women's relationships with their clothes. Oxford : Berg.

Shopping, consumption and fashion have become a lifestyle and where women experience an increasing number of consumer choices and demands on their times, assembling an outfit has become a complex task, fraught with difficulties and diverse option.

Shopping (and especially clothes shopping) is seen as a feminine process and clothes shops are a public space where women are allowed to wander around alone, wander around in pairs or groups and, importantly, take their time.

Clothes as both pain and pleasure surfaced most powerfully in relation to the activity of shopping.

The initial purchase of clothes is a key moment; there's always a reason why an item was selected. Each item promises something, whether it’s comfort, glamour or functionality.

As time wears on, so do we: our bodies age, moods change which may alter the way we war our clothes. In short, women have evolving relationships with their clothes.

Fashion lays a large part in a teenage girl’s life. The media bombard her with advertisements for clothes and emphasize a particular image.

Teenage magazines play an important part in shaping femininity.

They are concerned with personal relationships with physical appearance and with defining a particular form of beauty and style.

The goods and services that they buy are based on desire and not just need. Signs and symbols are sued to sell products and attract young women because they are a certain type of person and also because they wish to be seen as a certain type of person.

Girls have to learn clothing behaviour - to wear the right clothes.

Buy and embody the meanings associated with clothes and thus transfer the created meanings to themselves as wearers. In this way, women become the dupes in a system of manufactured meanings associated with less healthy dimensions of functioning.

The experience of ‘managing their wardrobes’, it argues that women routinely ‘watch themselves’ via personal surveillance of their appearance. This involves adopting a complex range of strategies which include the use of clothes and identity presentation.

Clothing is a form of communication.

Colour is a major indicator of what is ‘in fashion’. Changes in style tend, between seasons, to be relatively minor and colour tends to be the main determinant of what is fashionable.

Kept but no-longer-worn clothes in terms of them being the ‘fall-out’ the fashion system. By this we mean that women are seen as the ‘dupes’ of an exploitative fashion industry, buying and wearing clothes when they are deemed ‘fashionable’ but discarding them when they are later deemed ‘unfashionable’.

Torsten Neeland / Wooden Framework for Yohji Yamamoto / Dezeen

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Jon Gomez / MUJI / The hanging storage / Instagram

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Giorgio Bonaguro / The Oscar Desk / Instagram

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Martin Pärn and Edina Dufala-Pärn / The Leaning Coat Stand / Dezeen

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Room Divider / Geffrye Museum

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Natalia Geci / LYNKO / Pinterest

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A'postrophe Design / Inside Out Hanger / Dezeen

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Ana Mir and Emili Padros / Slastic Coat Rack / Design Milk

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Dot Home / Pinterest

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The design of LYNKO by Natalia Geci and the design furniture brand - Dot Home, both of them are inspiring me a lot for my final idea design.

Both design solving the problem of traditional wardrobe design are looking heavy, bulky and boring. Because their design are looking breathe freely, by using the minimalism style of the structure and material using with some nice and natural colour.

Both design gives me the new direction that I can looking at, rather than focus on wardrobe, I think clothes rail or clothes stand or clothes hanger are better direction to research onto.

Book / Product minimalism

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Book / Green first! / Gingko press

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Book notes / The sustainable fashion handbook / Sandy Black

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Book notes / The sustainable fashion handbook / Sandy Black

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Lisa Marie Bengtsson / Bye Bye Laundry / The Charcoal Clothes Hangers / Dezeen

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The Laundress / Fabric Spary

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How to Program Your Mind to Stop Buying Crap You Don’t Need

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Material Research / CSM Material Library

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Material Research / CSM Material Library

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Travel Suitcase Wardrobe / Pinterest

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Kreisdesign / Peg-it-all / Pegboard / Design Milk

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Sebastian Errazuriz / Piano Shelf / Pinterest

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Haori Hakama and Yukuta / NOI / Wooden Trestles and Sewn Tyvek Pockets / Dezeen

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Linen / CSM Material Library

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How to Use Hand Dyes from Dylon

DIY Dip Dye Denim Shorts

How to Choose the Best Interfacing Fabric

Book notes / The sustainable fashion handbook / Sandy Black

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Book notes / The sustainable fashion handbook / Sandy Black

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Book notes / The sustainable fashion handbook / Sandy Black

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Book notes / The sustainable fashion handbook / Sandy Black

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Book notes / The sustainable fashion handbook / Sandy Black

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Ethical vs. Sustainable vs. Slow Fashion Explained

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How to use deep space in the wardrobe

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Louis Vuitton Trunk / Google

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Le Corbusier / Wall-Mounted Coatrack / Pinterest

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Mark Hark / Shoe Tree / Core 77

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Macarons Colours / Google

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PVC / Book: Material For Design / Chris Lefteri

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PVC / Book: Material For Design / Chris Lefteri

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DIY: NO SEW Clear Totebag